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20130211
20130219
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KNTV (NBC) 15
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
above the earth. traveling about five miles per second. but slow down. nasa says there is absolutely no danger. >> it's not going to cause earthquakes, it's not going to cause any climate change. >> reporter: da14 was first discovered by amateur astronomers last february in spain. since then, nasa has been plotting its path and is certain there will be no impact. its closest approach expected to be near indonesia at 2:24 p.m. eastern on friday. images have already been captured on high-powered telescopes in australia. >> you won't be able to see it with the naked eye. with research and a decent telescope, you have a shot but your best bet may be to do what a lot of people around here will be doing, monitoring the nasa feed online. as it gets closer, nasa's powerful gold stone deep space communications complex will be taking radar imagery, research that could help scientists avoid disaster in the future. back in 1908, a smaller meteor hit in a remote region of siberia, destroying the landscape for hundreds of miles. and scientists blame the dinosaur's demise on a massive astroid. >> t
. >>> nasa ames is under investigation accused of sharing technology with china and other country. the fbi has been investigating nasa ames for the past four years. the congressmen say the u.s. attorney's office in northern california wants to bring criminal charges but has been blocked by the justice department. the u.s. attorney's office denies that claim. >>> we have new video from a courtroom in south africa. in one fatal night olympian oscar pistorius went from local superstar and international hero to standing trial for premeditated murder. during his very first hearing while these charges are being read he breaks down in tears. michelle kosinski witnessed it all in the courtroom. >> reporter: olympian oscar pistorius, accustomed to the cheer of victory, keeps his head down, now shielding his face from cameras to and from court. today the world press gathered him around while he's charged with the murder of his girlfriend shot three times in the head and body in pistorius's upscale well-secured home around 4:00 a.m. thursday. at 30, a cover girl, law school grad, soon to be reality s
,200 miles of earth's surface but then cruise safely back into space. >> reporter: nasa says it is the largest to fly this close to earth since the agency started keeping track. while the experts say it won't hit the earth, 130,000 metric tons of flying mass still makes people a little nervous. >> an impact by an object the size that will pass next week happens about every 1,200 years. >> reporter: to understand the true impact of asteroids striking earth, you have to travel back 66 million years. that's the time frame researchers at uc berkeley have newly pinpointed as the demise of the dinosaurs. >> the dinosaurs we think are wiped out around 66.043 million years ago. that's to within about 320,000 years. >> reporter: in a paper published this week, the group noted along with volcanos, the final nail in the dinosaur coffin likely fell from space. >> one is that an asteroid slammed into the earth. that wiped out the dinosaurs and a lot of life on earth. >> reporter: next friday's asteroid path isn't expected to be quite as spectacular but oakland space center will offer the
that was gunned down. and tim cook, and a nasa employee known as mohawk guy, there he is. he gained the nickname with the launch of the mars rover, curiosity. you can watch the state of the union dress tomorrow at 5:45. >> the governor of texas is making big claims, he said that the conservative state has knocked california off the perch as the nation's business leader. governor rick perry made the comments to the mercury news, this week he has meetings in san francisco, silicone valley and los angeles. he is trying to lure businesses to the sunshine state by show casing their best qualities. in the interview of course perry reportedly took shots at governor jerry brown and said, austin is posed to be the next silicone valley. and jerry brown said it was a cheap gimmick. >> a man is suing the coast guard for his pilots license. he is blamed for causing the worst oil spill in the san francisco bay in the decade when he crashed into the bay bridge. he was at fault and his pilot's license was in the process of being revoked. instead, he retired. his credentials were valid to 2010. the coast guard r
ever seen before. >> i'm a very much a visual scientist. >> he is working at nasa and now studying, mark has an impressive list of discoveries under his belt. the rings around jupiter. multiple rings and planets circli circli cirque uranis and now around pluto. one of mark's great skills seems to be his ability to strip away all of the visual noise that comes with taking pictures in space. and revealing what is hitten beneath. he also has a great instinct for knowing what to look for and where. like when he found a new moon orbiting saturn. >> i told my spouse that morning, i'm going to be looking for a moon near saturn today. so then i called home and said, guess what i did today? i found a moon around saturn. >> that no one had ever seen? >> that no one had ever seen. >> mark has been privileged to name many of them. a privilege he decided to share with the rest of us. remember those two moons orbiting pluto? right now they are calls p4 and p5. now a chance for the rest of us to share in mark's latest discovery, one unlikely to be his last. >> two moons in two years for me, that'
to deflect asteroids today. >> reporter: and that's a $450 million project expected to launch in 2018, nasa a junior partner. live in oakland, stephanie trong. >> thank you very much, stephanie. less than a day back on dry land and one passenger is already suing carnival cruiseline for the debacle on the ship. passengers spend four and a half hours without plumbing. she says they failed to provide a seaworthy vessel. carnival has offered to refund their ticket, a ticket for another cruise and $500. >> it's always devastating with a pet dies but even more devastating when it happens in someone else's care. there are dangers of shipping your animals carlo. >> jessica, money through hundreds of reports released to the department of transportation. we found some horrific incidents and discovered airlines can sometimes save few consequences. >> our bets become our best friend and leaving them can be devastating. kay lek going to -- >> he's in l.a. where they can take him to the beach and he's going to have an acre to live on. >> so to give him a better life, he's about to be shipped as cargo on
to discover more asteroids than earth-based telescopes have over the past 30 years. nasa has reportedly found most of the big asteroids that could wipe out mankind, but the smaller ones that could take out cities or regions, we only know about 1% of those. the goal for sentinel is to find those, and if we have several years warning scientists believe we could deflected any earth-bound rocks away from us. the bottom line, they don't want us to be blind-sided like we were yesterday when a large ten-ton meteor barrelled across the sky in siberia, traveling 59 more than 30,000 miles per hour, creating a shockwave that blew out windows and knocked down part of a factory. more than 1,000 people were injured. also yesterday, a 150-foot asteroid gave earth a close shave, passing 17,000 miles above the planet's surface. what's unnerve being that one, astronomers discovered it last year, too late do us any good if it was going to hit us. the asteroid gods treated the bay area to an amazing light show last night this is video of a fireball streaking across our sky around 8:00 in the evening. today the a
of collisions. >> reporter: aware, but how well is the world prepared? nasa budgeted $20 million last year to look for objects that may hit the earth but some scientists say more money should be spent on detection and ways to avoid a possible collision. >> we've gotten very good at finding the big things, the kilometer sized objects. we're working down to smaller objects. but there's many more of the small objects like these than there are of the big ones. >> i'd say the appropriate technology for deflecting a dangerous asteroid could possibly be a nuclear bomb, but the key is catching and detecting the objects early. >> reporter: experts say that friday's blast could have killed thousands of people had the meteor landed in the middle of a large city, a reminder they say that even smaller objects threatening earth should be a wake-up call. >> we knew factually we lived in a celestial falling rock zone, but friday taught us, reminded us that we live in a shooting gallery, in fact, we got into a crossfire. >> reporter: the power of the universe on display here on earth. michelle franzen, nbc
that are projected to a flat plan, we take pictures around an object so you get 3d digital model. nasa's case, we scanned the image of insulated tile and then we create repair, that's idea call shape of the damage. this data gets sent up to space station and they cut it out with the repair and the spacewalker can go out, fit it in, seal it, and then the damage is repaired. >> and we've got some props on the desk. tell me about what you brought us today. >> okay. so this is a 3d printed shoe and we're experimenting the art, which is a mesh of many object. the material, lighter weight with a lot of empty spaces. in the heel, and then also it is molded to the shape of my feet so it's completely custom made. >> ping, good to have you on the program. thank you so much. >>> up next, the coming news in the upcoming week that will be have impact "on the money." and is the city of new york city takeout in jeopardy? may michael bloomberg's list of banned substances as we take a break. look at how the stock market ended the week. back in a moment. look at how th market ended the week. back in a moment. look
here on earth. nasa has reportedly found most of the ones that could destroy our planet but as far as the ones that are smaller and destroy cities and wipe out regions, as far as those are concerned 99% are a mystery to us, we only now about 1% of them. the foundation believes it's so-called sentinel telescope can discover more asteroids in its first month of service in 2018 than all of our earth-based telescopes have been able to do over the past 30 years. scientists believe they could be deflected away from earth if we have several years warning. we need years, not months. you think about the 150-foot asteroid that passed close to earth yesterday. that was only discovered last year, no one enough time to done any good. that's what the b-612 foundation is trying to change. on a side note about the fireball seen streaking over the west coast including the bay area last night around 8:00, today the american meteor society says that that meteor was not what we would consider to be a major event. that these things happen every night around the world just not always over densely popula
in oakland. >> reporter: you're looking at video taken by nasa showing a 150-foot asteroid as seen from australia this morning coming closer to earth than any rock its size. >> it sounded like a safeway, a supermarket, or an olympic sized swimming pool in size. the mass is 130,000 metric tons, which is equivalent to 60,000 suvs, so, you know, it's a big piece of rock. >> reporter: but the much anticipated asteroid is getting overshadowed by a smaller meteor that actually made its way to earth. these incredible images show the ten ton meteor floating over russia smashing windows and injuring hundreds. but experts say the cosmic rock completely unrelated to the da-14 asteroid. >> it's actually been a double whammy day. a lot of interesting things going on. but it is just a coincidence. it's not marking the beginning of a rain of asteroids coming at us. >> i'm thankful for that. >> reporter: all the cosmic activity catching the attention of glenn rivera who recently had a close encounter with a meteor ite when one hit his neighbor's roof on his birthday in october. he still has a chunk of
:25. beginning at 11:00 a.m. nasa will broadcast live images of the asteroid online as it sweeps by. >> it doesn't look that big when you look at it like that. >> let's turn things over to jeff live from at&t park. instead of love being in the air, love is in the field. >> yes, it is. i know a lot of you at home are just tuning in right now. we're actually in centerfield at at&t park. they have lent the field to an incredible organization. back behind me they're still preparing for hearst after dark which starts at 7:30. i was out on the dance floor earlier. i think everybody ran the other way. a huge organization coming out for tonight's hearst after dark to raise a lot of money for the greater good here in the community. stephanie bray with san francisco general hospital foundation joins us. stephanie, this is something that you guys at the hospital are working towards all year long. >> yes, absolutely. the work that goes on at the hospital we try to share as much as we can. and get as many people involved. and there are a lot of people involved in putting this event together. >> so this event
? nasa says it was likely a meteor. not a space rock that streaked across skies over russia where 1,000 are recovering from injuries. the damage estimate for that, $33 million. and that happened on the same day that an asteroid half the size of a football field did a drive-by, passing 17,000 miles above earth. dr. hakin oleshegy is a scientist at the florida institute of technology and spokesperson for the science channel. nice to have you with us this morning. >> good morning. i'm happy to be here. >> first we need to clear up a few thing. initially we were calling that space rock in russia a meteorite. but it actually of an asteroid as well as the other one. >> well, you know, the naming of these rocks is kind of interesting, right? this object originated in the asteroid belt, so it is an asteroid. when it became streaking through our skies, we call it a meteor. then when it became a fireball, we called it a bolide. when the part hit the ground, fragments, we call those meteorites. >> i think i followed all that. >> yeah. >> you started off with the fact that it came from the aste
has been investigating nasa for the past four years. the congressmen say the u.s. attorney's office in northern californ wants to bring criminal charges, but has been blocked by the justice department. the u.s. attorney's office denies that claim. >>> several people are hurt this morning after a police chase ends with a shooting in san francisco. police say a stolen town car tried to get away from officers near the intersection of eddy and jones streets. after a short chase t car swerved on to the sidewalk to avoid spike strips. one officer shot at the car which kept going before crashing into a taxi and two other cars. the suspect is now under arrest, four other people are hurt. >>> we'll take a look at the forecast. >>> 9:28. welcome back. taking a live look at the hills in sunol. beautiful clear sky overhead. we need the rain to keep these hills green and it's on the way. but not before we get to 80 in some places. 45 degrees in san jose, 44 in gilroy. look at santa rosa, they're still at 35 degrees because we had a stubborn pocket of fog that hung out there all day. it's our tur
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)